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Cars with Flood Damage to be Sold on the Second-Hand Market

Why You Should Always Inspect a Car Before Buying it

Are you thinking of buying a new car soon? Well, I’d be careful because as we all know, some car dealers will employ some pretty sketchy business practices if it means selling cars. Some of the 500,000 cars wrecked by Hurricane Harvey are being sent to the scrap yards after insurance has been claimed by their owners. The vehicles that weren’t totaled, however, can be expected to show up on the used market with salvage titles.

This gives people the opportunity to buy these cars up cheap, clear visible damage quickly and flip the cars as if they had never been damaged. Although people buying cars from or in Florida will have their suspicions about flood damage, a lot of these cars will be sold out of state meaning that anyone can be fooled by the idea.

Carfax, an online car history report website, offers some advice on how to look out for flood damage when buying a car. First off, the upholstery does not match the carpet, rusty door hinges, damaged seat belts or inside bolts damaged. Also check the engine bay and trunk for water lines. Carfax recommends getting a history report when buying a car to avoid getting stung by this scam.

Even if you’re in desperate need of a vehicle, it’s extremely important to do solid research and thorough checks before you sign on the dotted line. If you’re in the market for a used vehicle, make sure you thoroughly check the vehicle and its history. If there’s a chance it was devastated by Harvey or Irma, steer clear.

Categories: Automotive News

Chris Riley
About Chris Riley

I have been wrecking cars for as long as I’ve been driving them but I keep coming back for more. Two wheels or four, I’m all in. GearHeads.org gives me a chance to give something back to the automobile community.