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The 2017 Honda CBR1000RR Price Announced: MSRP $17k

Or $16,999 to be precise – but even with Honda’s new updates and revisions, it might be a little too pricey…especially when compared with its rivals. Put it on the track against Suzuki’s new GSX-R models, Yamaha’s R1, or Kawasaki’s ZX-10R, and the Honda is likely to come off worse… In terms of bang for your buck, it doesn’t fare much better either. However, Honda have never really pushed the CBR1000RR in the horsepower war, but they’re pushing a respectable power to weight ratio for the 2017 model, as well as some rather impressive onboard gadgetry. Does it warrant the price tag? Well that’s not for me to say – but if anyone out there is looking at buying a liter class sportbike this year, they’ve got some serious thinking to do.

To keep things fresh for 2017, Honda have treated their flagship sportsbike with some rather exciting electronics. The bulk of the new additions have been worked around a sophisticated 5-axis Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) which keeps an eye on all aspects of the bike, on every plane, and measures the ins and outs and tells the rest of the bike what to do. It’s hooked up to Honda’s Selectable Torque Control system, and manages rear wheel traction through the ECU and the Throttle By Wire. It also keeps an eye on the ABS, and offers superior braking under any circumstances. Add Rear Lift Control and Wheelie Control into the mix, and you’ve got quite a smart package.

The new electronic features are controlled by a by a cool left hand switch gear, and displayed on a TFT liquid crystal display – the very same unit that’s featured on Honda’s ridiculously expensive RC213V-S machine, which in itself is a direct road-going descendent of the Honda Repsol RC213V MotoGP racer. The screen has three display modes: Street, Circuit, and Mechanic, and they give the rider all the information for any circumstance.

Electronics aside, the 2017 CBR still holds on to Honda’s core values from back in 1992: to strive for the optimal balance of power and weight, rather than just focusing on out and out power. Having said that, Honda have increased the power for the 2017 edition, by a not so insignificant 10 hp, bringing the total up to 189 hp at 13,000. The new power figure is thanks to a few new components, a higher compression ratio, revised cam timing, and an Accelerator Position Sensor.

But to get the right kind of power to weight ratio that Honda is known for, other changes had to be made. The power is up and the weight has gone down thanks to the careful application of expensive metals, such as magnesium in the engine and a titanium muffler, and a careful redesign of key chassis components. The frame is more rigid than before and carries less weight, the swingarm has been stiffened, the wheels sport a new design, and a new rear subframe helps the new CBR weigh in whole 33 pounds (15 kg) lighter than last year’s model.

The overall aesthetic styling is a little more aggressive; all in all it’s a slimmer beast than we’ve seen before from Honda, and the minimalist aesthetic is quite pleasing. If you’re sold on the CBR, you can look forward to buying it in either Victory Red or Matte Ballistic Black Metallic, depending on which flavor you like best. The proper release date is set for April, and the asking price is $16,999 (without ABS) – but is that a little too much? If you add on the usual dealership fees and then compare it with its nearest competitors, it’s a little pricey.

However, if you’re still sold on Honda but want a higher spec machine, the SP1 is slated to sell for $19,999, and the SP2 for $24,999 (although the latter isn’t set in stone).

Categories: Motorcycles

Joe Appleton
About Joe Appleton

I’ve done a bit of work here and there in the industry – I’ve even ridden a few bikes for actual money but what it comes down to is this: I ride bikes, build bikes and occasionally crash ‘em too. I like what I like but that certainly doesn’t make my opinion any more valid than yours…