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Mustang Boss 429 Awakens From 40-Year Long Slumber

Mustang Boss 429 is arguably one of the most coveted and rarest muscle cars ever made. Only 1,358 were ever made during 1969 and 1970, and they came as a result of Ford’s NASCAR aspirations. NASCAR rules at the time dictated that at least 500 cars should be fitted with the entrant engine and sold to general public (Ford’s big-block 385 in this instance), before being admitted into the protocol. After tagging Galaxie as perfect fit for their new Blue Crescent 429 engine, Ford eventually decided to use Mustang instead. The challenge of fitting big-block into a pony car was issued to Kar Kraft of Brighton, Michigan, and Boss 9 was born.

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This particular 1969 Mustang Boss 429 was bought by Charles Avery from Fort Worth, Texas dealer back in ’73 for only $1,475. Oil shock of the time had really crippled performance-oriented muscle car scene, so the sticker isn’t that surprising. Avery, however, moved to Bismarck, North Dakota in ’76 and put his Boss 9 into storage where it remained for four straight decades. He always wanted to restore it, but only brought it to Muscle Car Restorations (MCR) of Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, last year. Ultimately, Avery sold the car to John Balow, the owner of MCR who, then found someone willing to finally restore the car to its former glory.

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Before they started with the restoration, MCR maestros called in the cavalry. Boss Mustang expert Bob Perkins of Perkins Restorations in Juneau, Wisconsin was invited to thoroughly inspect the car. This gets even more meaning since nothing is known of Boss 429’s life before ’73, besides it was initially sold in Dallas.

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And so Bob Perkins and the MCR team started digging in and around this Mustang Boss 429. First things first, though. Kar Kraft Engineering decal with # 1732 is still on the doorjamb, and it will remain there. MCR won’t repaint this since it’s still original. Rest of the paint, however, isn’t, although it looks like it at first glance. Someone had repainted the car a long time ago, and it seems that happened before Avery bought it back in ’73. Engine too, was repainted, but serial numbers all match, so there’s no doubt it’s original. Could it be this Boss 9 was used as a racer back in the day?

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Engine itself only lacks air cleaner, air pump and master cylinder – latter of whose was removed by the latest owner. Apart from that, and service replacement battery, and plug wires, everything else is as it was 40 odd years ago. Same can be said about the interior. Everything seems to be in perfect shape (as much as it can be after 40 years in storage), apart from slight headliner damage. Only non-original part inside is Hurst T-handle shifter. Needless to say, MCR will reuse everything they can in order to keep the Boss 9 intact as much as they are able to. This means stuffing current upholstery with new foam, reusing the carpets and dusting off the rest of the cabin.

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Another promising thing about the car is the fact that sheetmetal is almost completely rust-free. Even footwells are still clean and sound. 1969 Mustang Boss 429 even has the factory exhaust, although exhaust dumps have been replaced. When guys from MCR finally brushed the dust and rust off the car, they understood why it remained almost intact all these years. Undercoating/sound deadener is still thick and sound as the day it was applied by hand in Dearborn, Michigan factory. Guess special edition Mustang deserved some special touches which are so rare these days.

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In any case, restoration of this Boss 9 is finally underway, and Muscle Car Restorations will have their hands full for quite some time. It’s not only about restoring the car, but about collecting every little bit of historical data that could help them in this endeavor. They have decided to go with classic restoration and they won’t fix what doesn’t need fixing, even if it doesn’t look representative. Guess we’ll meet this Boss 9 again in couple of years or so. Can’t wait for this to happen. When it does, we can expect it to look similar to this Kar Kraft # 2,447 1970 Boss Mustang.

Categories: Gear Grinding

Nikola Potrebić

About Nikola Potrebić

Although driving a piece of junk, Nikola is a true car enthusiast. Very few things move him as muscle cars do - especially those from the golden era. Which makes him wonder: why wasn't he born a few decades earlier? Well, at least he's been able to enjoy the likes of Pontiak Aztek, Fiat Multipla, and the likes this way - right?